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48 project related information(s) found

    • IsabelleF

      PACIFIC Final Events: PACIFIC Symposium and Kallak Workshop

      Brief description :

      The PACIFIC symposium and Kallak Workshop will take place on 27-28 October 2021 at the Killian Amphitheater of the Earth Science Institute (ISTerre). ISTerre is located on the campus of the University of Grenoble-Alpes (UGA) in Saint-Martin d’Hères/Gières, France.

      It is expected that participants will attend on site but please note that the PACIFIC final events can also be attended online. All participants are invited to register using the link to the dedicated registration platform (below, see URL section). The program and the logistic pack are also available from the registration platform.

      Deadline to register: Monday 11th October 2021 at the latest

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      Type of information :
      • IsabelleF

        PACIFIC FINAL EVENTS AT UNIVERSITE GRENOBLE ALPES: SAVE THE DATE !

        Brief description :

        Funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Universite Grenoble Alpes, PACIFIC is a research project in the field of mineral exploration. The project aims at developing new exploration techniques that respect the environment and incur relatively low costs. Join us in Grenoble on 27-28 October to find out how the PACIFIC consortium has been conducting fundamental and applied research to develop two radically new and complementary mineral exploration techniques, both based on passive seismic imagery.

        The detailed programme and registration platform will soon be available. Stay tuned !

        PACIFIC FINAL EVENTS SAVE THE DATE

        Type of information :
        • IsabelleF

          Teodor, D., Beard, C., Pinzon-Rincon, L. A., Mordret, A., Lavoué, F., Beaupretre, S., Boué, P., and...

          Brief description :

          Ambient noise surface wave tomography (ANSWT) is an environmentally friendly and cost-effective technique for subsurface imaging. In this study, we used natural (low-frequency) and anthropogenic (high-frequency) noise sources to map the velocity structure of the Marathon Cu-PGE deposit (Ontario, Canada) to a depth of 1 km. The Marathon deposit is a circular (ø = 25 km) alkaline intrusion comprising gabbros at the rim and an overlying series of syenites in the centre. Cu-PGE mineralisation is hosted by gabbros close to the inward-dipping footwall of the intrusion. The country rocks are Archaean volcanic breccias that are seismically slower than the gabbros, and similar in velocity to the syenites. We used ANSWT to image the footwall contact that controls the location of the mineralisation.

          An array of 1024 vertical-component receivers were deployed for 30 days to record ambient noise required for surface wave analysis. Two overlapping grids were used: a 200 m x 6040 m dense array with node spacing of 50 m, and a 2500 m x 4000 m sparse array with node spacing of 150 m. The signal was down-sampled to 50 Hz, divided into segments of 30 minutes, cross-correlated and stacked. Surface wave analysis was conducted over the dense array and the sparse array data. We considered the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave propagation for our frequency-wavenumber (F-K) analysis and focused on the phase velocity variation in the high-frequency ambient noise signal (up to 22 Hz). We reconstructed the shallow structure with progressively increased resolution using surface wave dispersion curves extracted from receiver arrays divided into segments of variable lengths. Several average dispersion curves were computed from individual dispersion curves belonging to different seismic lines. Each average dispersion curve was inverted to obtain S-wave velocity models using an McMC transdimensional Bayesian approach.

          The tomographic images reveal a shallow high-velocity anomaly, which we interpret as being related to the gabbro intrusion that hosts the mineralization. The large-wavelength structures in the S-wave velocity models are relatively consistent with the geological structures inferred from surface mapping and drill core data. These results show that the ANSWT, focused on the high-frequency signal provided by anthropogenic noise sources, is an efficient technique for imaging “shallow" (1 km depth) geological structures in a mineral exploration context.

          Type of information :
          • IsabelleF

            PACIFIC activities presented at a virtual seminar organised by Geological Survey of Canada, Natural...

            Brief description :

            At the invitation of Dr. Andrew Schaeffer (Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada), Dr. François Lavoué (UGA) presented the PACIFIC work on the use of seismic signals generated by trains for passive seismic imaging and monitoring on May 5th, 2021. The presentation provided an overview of the activities carried out within the framework of both the PACIFIC and FaultScan EU-funded projects.

            The presentation was attended by around 40 people. Technical questions revolved around the parameters controlling signal amplitude, and a more general debate took place on the merits of excluding signals generated by trains from "classic" ambient noise datasets, as is done for earthquakes.

             

            Type of information :
            • IsabelleF

              PACIFIC workplan structure and interactions

              Brief description :

              PACIFIC workplan structure

               
              Type of information :
              • IsabelleF

                2020-12-01 Can mining make the world a greener place?

                Brief description :

                Click here to download the press release (Pdf format) announcing the online event co-organised by INFACT, PACIFIC and the NHM on December 3-4, 2020.

                Can mining make the world a greener place?

                Type of information :
                • IsabelleF

                  M. Chmiel, A. Mordret, P. Boué, F. Brenguier, T. Lecocq, R. Courbis, D. Hollis, X. Campman, R....

                  Brief description :

                  Ambient noise multimode Rayleigh and Love wave tomography to determine the shear velocity structure above the Groningen gas field

                  The Groningen gas field is one of the largest gas fields in Europe. The continuous gas extraction led to an induced seismic activity in the area. In order to monitor the seismic activity and study the gas field many permanent and temporary seismic arrays were deployed. In particular, the extraction of the shear wave velocity model is crucial in seismic hazard assessment. Local S-wave velocity-depth profiles allow us the estimation of a potential amplification due to soft sediments.

                  Ambient seismic noise tomography is an interesting alternative to traditional methods that were used in modelling the S-wave velocity. The ambient noise field consists mostly of surface waves, which are sensitive to the Swave and if inverted, they reveal the corresponding S-wave structures.

                  In this study, we present results of a depth inversion of surface waves obtained from the cross-correlation of 1 month of ambient noise data from four flexible networks located in the Groningen area. Each block consisted of about 400 3-C stations. We compute group velocity maps of Rayleigh and Love waves using a straight-ray surface wave tomography. We also extract clear higher modes of Love and Rayleigh waves.

                  The S-wave velocity model is obtained with a joint inversion of Love and Rayleigh waves using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. In order to improve the depth inversion, we use the mean phase velocity curves and the higher modes of Rayleigh and Love waves. Moreover, we use the depth of the base of the North Sea formation as a hard constraint. This information provides an additional constraint for depth inversion, which reduces the S-wave velocity uncertainties.

                  The final S-wave velocity models reflect the geological structures up to 1 km depth and in perspective can be used in seismic risk modelling.

                  Type of information :
                  • IsabelleF

                    F. Brenguier, P. Boué, Y. Ben‐Zion, F. Vernon, C.W. Johnson, A. Mordret, et al. (2019). Train...

                    Brief description :

                    Train traffic as a powerful noise source for monitoring active faults with seismic interferometry.

                    Laboratory experiments report that detectable seismic velocity changes should occur in the vicinity of fault zones prior to earthquakes. However, operating permanent active seismic sources to monitor natural faults at seismogenic depth is found to be nearly impossible to achieve. We show that seismic noise generated by vehicle traffic, and especially heavy freight trains, can be turned into a powerful repetitive seismic source to continuously probe the Earth's crust at a few kilometers depth. Results of an exploratory seismic experiment in Southern California demonstrate that correlations of train‐generated seismic signals allow daily reconstruction of direct P body waves probing the San Jacinto Fault down to 4‐km depth. This new approach may facilitate monitoring most of the San Andreas Fault system using the railway and highway network of California.

                    Type of information :
                    • IsabelleF

                      Florent Brenguier, Aurélien Mordret, Richard Lynch, Roméo Courbis, Xander Campbell, Pierre Boué,...

                      Brief description :

                      Monitoring of fields using body and surface waves reconstructed from passive seismic ambient noise

                      There are important economic, environmental and societal reasons for monitoring production from oil, gas and geothermal fields. Unfortunately, standard microseismic monitoring is often not useful due to low levels of microseismicity. We propose to use body and surface waves reconstructed from ambient seismic noise for such monitoring. In this work, we use seismic data recorded from a dense sensor array at the Groningen gas field in northern Holland and show how direct P-waves can be extracted from the ambient noise cross correlations and then used to monitor seismic velocity variations over time. This approach has advantages over the use of coda wave interferometry due to the ability to localise such changes in the subsurface. We show how both direct and refracted (head) P-waves as well as Rayleigh surface waves can be used for such field monitoring, with changes of ∼1% being resolved. Both fundamental and first overtone Rayleigh waves are used to localise such changes, which correspond nicely to known geology to within 100 m.

                      Type of information :
                      • IsabelleF

                        Tomoya Takano, Florent Brenguier, Michel Campillo, Aline Peltier, Takeshi Nishimura, Noise-based...

                        Brief description :

                        Noise-based passive ballistic wave seismic monitoring on an active volcano

                        Monitoring temporal changes of volcanic interiors is important to understand magma, fluid pressurization and transport leading to eruptions. Noise-based passive seismic monitoring using coda wave interferometry is a powerful tool to detect and monitor very slight changes in the mechanical properties of volcanic edifices. However, the complexity of coda waves limits our ability to properly image localized changes in seismic properties within volcanic edifices. In this work, we apply a novel passive ballistic wave seismic monitoring approach to examine the active Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion island). Using noise correlations between two distant dense seismic arrays, we find a 2.4 per cent velocity increase and −0.6 per cent velocity decrease of Rayleigh waves at frequency bands of 0.5–1 and 1–3 Hz, respectively. We also observe a −2.2 per cent velocity decrease of refracted P waves at 550 m depth at the 6–12 Hz band. We interpret the polarity differences of seismic velocity changes at different frequency bands and for different wave types as being due to strain change complexity at depth associated with subtle pressurization of the shallow magma reservoir. Our results show that velocity changes measured using ballistic waves provide complementary information to interpret temporal changes of the seismic properties within volcanic edifices.

                        Type of information :